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Pictures from the Past

The closest thing we have to a time machine…

North Shields celebrates its 800th birthday next year. Here’s the story of its early growth and how it was attacked and burned down by the merchants of Newcastle: penbal.uk/what-the-first-shields-were-like/
Romans soldiers overlooking the Tyne Valley in 150 AD. Read more here: penbal.uk/divide-et-impera-another-way-to-look-at-hadrians-wall/
Collingwood at Trafalgar. Before he fired the first broadside, he doubleshotted all of his 32-pound cannons on the 100-gun Royal Sovereign. Watch this video to learn about what happened that day: https://youtu.be/or7If8VXxDA
In 794, one year after the first Viking raids in England on the island of Lindisfarne, Tynemouth was attacked by marauding norsemen. This 2-part story, exclusive to Penbal, by the novelist Robert Westall (1929-1993) describes the raids and how the local population fought back!
Benebalcrag, May 7th 794 — by Robert Westall
Many of you will know the tragic tale of Wandering Willie. It is part of Tynemouth folklore and the body of the loyal sheepdog still resides, stuffed, in a glass cabinet in The Turks Head pub. However, we feel there may be one final chapter left in the tale of Wandering Willie — there’s perhaps life in this old dog yet…
The story of St Cuthbert’s Miracle, told by Bede in 716, is the first appearance of Tynemouth in the pages of history. You can read about it and the origins of Tynemouth here: https://penbal.uk/the-beginnings-of-tynemouth/#cuthberts-miracle
The real Jingling Geordie was Captain Thomas Armstrong, ‘the Smuggler King’. Beneath his house on Cullercoats Bay he built secret cellars and a tunnel to hide the tea and brandy he had seized. In this picture his sloop Mermaid lies off the bay. To learn more about him watch this video: https://youtu.be/Y23d6X-c5xU
Roman soldiers land on Tynemouth Short Sands in 79 AD. The local population have already fled inland. These two posts look at what form the interactions between the Romans and the Iron Age Britons of Penbal Crag would have taken:
Where Were They? The Absence of Roman Settlement in Tynemouth
Why Hadrian’s Wall Didn’t Go to the Sea — Approaching a Definitive Answer
River Tyne from Arbeia in 80 AD, 40 years before the Wall. A portion of Agricola’s fleet are being resupplied before his campaign in Caledonia. Watch this video to learn about the history of the fort at South Shields https://youtu.be/6mCAfDEm3Wg
The press gang causing mayhem on the Fish Quay in 1805, dragging people from the Low Lights Tavern off to the ships. Read:
An Order to Deploy the Press Gang in North Shields
The Mary Rose on the Haven in 1539